RSS

Our hearts go out to all California residents and especially our policyholders. Along with the rest of the nation, we are closely monitoring the wildfires that are ravaging the state. Please know that if you are in areas impacted by the wildfires, we are relaxing our normal renewal protocols, and we will be lenient with non-payments and late renewals. In the meantime, you may continue to receive notices from us, but if you are in the impacted areas, know that we will work with you to ensure you are able to retain coverage and avoid any additional charges for renewing after a reasonable deadline. Our main concern is for you to be safe and renew or pay your premiums when you can safely do so.


If you have been practicing in the Allied Health space for years or are a new practitioner, you likely have heard the saying, “If it wasn’t documented, it wasn’t done.” This may have been taught in your training to enter your profession. Proper documentation is not as clear-cut as this statement, however. Documentation is critical, but there are also times when certain observations or occurrences may not be memorialized when documenting in an electronic medical record (EMR) or in written format.


Congratulations on graduating and entering the Allied Health profession! There are many issues you may not have learned about while in school. This risk management resource discusses: the type of employment arrangement you may have with your new position, what to consider if being presented with a contract for employment, and considerations if planning to open your own business or practice.


The landscape of behavioral health is changing. Some primary care offices are now employing or contracting with behavioral health providers (BHP) and psychiatric providers to consult about and/or treat patients. These models vary in structure but can be referred to as a collaborative care, integrated care, or co-located care model.


As an allied health professional, you will experience ending a patient relationship at some point in your career. This can be initiated either by you or your patient and can be for a variety of reasons including: non-compliance with treatment, challenging issues, a result of relocation, or non-payment for services.


The landscape of behavioral health is changing. Some primary care offices are now employing or contracting with behavioral health providers (BHP) and psychiatric providers to consult about and/or treat patients. These models vary in structure but can be referred to as a collaborative care, integrated care, or co-located care model


We have seen significant changes in how behavioral health services are provided to patients. One of the most significant changes in recent years is delivering these services via telebehavioral health methods. Some of the reasons for utilizing telebehavioral health interventions include serving patients who live in areas where there are limited services, inability of patients to access services in person due to medical and/or behavioral health issues, among others. There are a variety of settings and roles where telebehavioral health may be seen.


No matter in which area you work within Allied Health, you will at some point encounter the difficult patient. Difficult patients may include those who are argumentative, hostile or who are non-compliant with treatment. These patients may be in all settings--outpatient, inpatient as well as other types of settings. You may also be treating a minor and his/her parent may be difficult or may be involved in a difficult situation such as a divorce or custody battle. Here are a few tips to follow when encountering the difficult patient or family member.


Trust Risk Management Services, Inc. insures over one hundred types of Allied Health Professionals including Marriage and Family Therapists, Licensed Professional Counselors, Behavior Analysts, Social Workers and other Allied Health Professionals not related to behavioral health including Dietitians, Dental Hygienists, Physical Therapists and many others. As an Allied Health Professional, you may work in a variety of settings including hospitals, outpatient centers, clinics and small or solo group practices (“employer”).


Most Allied Health professionals will, at some point, experience a patient or family members who are non-compliant with treatment. There are a number of tips to keep in mind when dealing with a patient who is non-compliant…


NOTE: This information is provided as a risk management resource and is not legal advice or an individualized personal consultation. At the time this resource was prepared, all information was as current and accurate as possible; however, regulations, laws, or prevailing professional practice standards may have changed since the posting or recording of this resource. Accordingly, it is your responsibility to confirm whether regulatory or legal issues that are relevant to you have since been updated and/or to consult with your professional advisors or legal counsel for timely guidance specific to your situation. As with all professional use of material, please explicitly cite The Trust Companies as the source if you reproduce or distribute any portion of these resources. Reproduction or distribution of this resource without the express written permission of The Trust Companies is strictly prohibited.